1. "

    If you find a girl that is willing to go through hell just to keep the relationship going, you really shouldn’t take her love for granted.

    Going through hell for someone and in return being taken for granted was the most painful thing I’ve ever experienced. Never. Again.

    "
     

  2. I just found out my ex did everything he accused me of doing. he thought I was the same horrible person he was, so he would accuse me of things and there was no way to prove my innocence as I was already guilty in his eyes, leading to horrible fights, mental, emotional and physical abuse…. yet I have real proof of his crimes and it’s somehow supposed to not be a big deal?

    don’t let a relationship get in the way of your education or goals (since I let mine suffer) just so you don’t feel alone.

     

  3. i have been attempting to add a hatch to a floorplan in autocad for about 4 hours now………………………………….

     

  4. single

    tired of his lies and abuse

     

  5. some music just brings back too many weird sad memories when i was all alone in san diego right after transfering there and breaking up with my ex 

    ugh i just want to cry….remembering driving around san diego not knowing what the fuck was going to happen

     
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  10. nevver:

    When some words have hit the big time, they’ve left clunky related words behind.
    1. EXHAUST/INHAUST
      While “exhaust,” from the Latin for “draw out of,” was first attested in 1540 and went on to a great career in the English vocabulary, “inhaust,” with the meaning “draw into,” was attested in 1547 (something about a “flye inhausted into a mannes throte sodenly”) but soon became obsolete.
    2. OMNISCIENT/NESCIENT
      You know about “omniscient,” which comes from the Latin for “all knowing,” but did you know there was a counterpart meaning “not knowing”? You can now consider yourself more-scient!
    3. RESUSCITATE/EXSUSCITATE
      “Exsuscitate” was around in the 1500s, as was “resuscitate,” but where “resuscitate” was for the act of bringing someone back from the dead, “exsuscitate” was for the less impressive act of rousing or waking someone up from sleep. It didn’t stick, and it doesn’t look likely to be resuscitated.
    4. PRELIMINARY/POSTLIMINARY
      “Postliminary” has a technical use in international law, where it refers to the “right of postliminy” (stuff taken in war gets returned), but it’s also been used sporadically since the early 19th century as the opposite of “preliminary.”
    5. INCANTATION/EXCANTATION
      If your incantation turns out to be a magic spell that somehow gets you in a jam, it might be good to be able to perform an excantation to get yourself out of it. Too bad the word, attested in 1580, is now obsolete.
    6. INCRIMINATION/CONCRIMINATION
      It wouldn’t be fun to be the subject of an incrimination, but it might be a little more fun to be part of a concrimination with your friends, meaning “a joint accusation.” The word shows up in a 1656 dictionary, but we have no evidence that anyone ever used it.
    7. INAUGURATE/EXAUGURATE
      Back in 1600 the word “inaugurate” was used to describe a ceremonial act of consecration or induction into office, but there was also the word “exaugurate” meaning, according to the OED, “To cancel the inauguration of; to unhallow, make profane.”
    more

     
  11.  

  12. nevver:

    1. PETRICHOR
      The scent of rain on dry ground.
    2. EYESOME
      Easy on the eyes.
    3. TOOTHSOME
      Delicious.
    4. JUCUNDITY
      Merry enjoyment, delight.
    5. SALUBRIOUS
      Good for the health.
    6. VOLUPTUATE
      To take luxurious pleasure in something.
    7. DULCILOQUENT
      Having a gentle, sweet way of speaking.
    8. SNUGGERY
      A cozy little room.
    9. SUAVILOQUENCE
      Soothing, agreeable speech.
    10. EUPHONY
      The quality of sounding good or pleasing to the ear.
    11. VISCEROTONIC
      Having a comfort-loving, easygoing, social personality.
    12. ADLUBESCENCE
      Pleasure, enjoyment.
    13. OBLECTAMENT
      A source of delight.
    14. PULCHRITUDINOUS
      Beautiful.
    15. PHILOCALIST
      A lover of beautiful things.

     

  13. nevver:

    1. ABYSSINIAN MEDAL
      Military slang, introduced after the Abyssinian War, for a button in the abdomen area “gone astray from its buttonhole.” This is probably what happens to your vest-wearing uncle after a hearty Thanksgiving meal.
    2. AMEN CORNER
      A California term for a church.
    3. BASKET OF ORANGES
      This phrase, which referred to a pretty woman, originated in Australia before making its way to England. “A metaphor founded on another metaphor,” author Andrew Forrester writes, “the basket of oranges being a phrase for the discovery of nuggets of gold in gold fields.”
    4. BEER BOTTLE
      Not something you drink out of, but a street term for “a stout, red-faced man.”
    5. CAN’T YOU FEEL THE SHRIMP?
      Cockney, from 1877, meaning “smell the sea.”
    6. CHEEK-ACHE
      “Blushing or turning red in the face rather from the meanness of another than your own.”
    7. CUT A FINGER
      A lower-class phrase meaning “to cause a disagreeable odor.”
    8. DAMNED GOOD SWINE UP
      A term from 1880, “suspected to be of American origin,” for a loud quarrel.
    9. DIMBER-DAMBER
      A street term meaning “smart, active, adroit. One of the alliterative phrases with absolutely no meaning.”
    10. FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE
      A Lancashire term for “swearing followed by kicking.”
    11. MOUTH-PIE
      A street term for scolding, as delivered by a woman.
    12. NURSE THE HOE-HANDLE
      A term from agricultural American meaning “lazy.” You’re not being a lump on your couch—you’re nursing the hoe-handle!
    13. RAKED FORE AND AFT
      Desperately in love.
    14. SPONGE IT OUT
      This term, used beginning in 1883, meant “forget it.”
    15. START A JOLLY
      To lead applause. The next time you do the slow clap, tell everyone you’re starting a jolly.

     

  14. nevver:

    1. Afternoonified
      A society word meaning “smart.” Forrester demonstrates the usage: “The goods are not ‘afternoonified’ enough for me.”
    2. Arfarfan’arf
      A figure of speech used to describe drunken men. “He’s very arf’arf’an’arf,” Forrester writes, “meaning he has had many ‘arfs,’” or half-pints of booze.
    3. Back slang it
      Thieves used this term to indicate that they wanted “to go out the back way.”
    4. Bags o’ Mystery
      An 1850 term for sausages, “because no man but the maker knows what is in them. … The ‘bag’ refers to the gut which contained the chopped meat.”
    5. Bang up to the elephant
      This phrase originated in London in 1882, and means “perfect, complete, unapproachable.”
    6. Batty-fang
      Low London phrase meaning “to thrash thoroughly,” possibly from the French battre a fin.
    7. Benjo
      Nineteenth century sailor slang for “A riotous holiday, a noisy day in the streets.”
    8. Bow wow mutton
      A naval term referring to meat so bad “it might be dog flesh.”
    9. Bricky
      Brave or fearless. “Adroit after the manner of a brick,” Forrester writes, “said even of the other sex, ‘What a bricky girl she is.’”
    10. Bubble Around
      A verbal attack, generally made via the press. Forrester cites The Golden Butterfly: “I will back a first-class British subject for bubbling around against all humanity.”
    11. Butter Upon Bacon
      Extravagance. Too much extravagance. “Are you going to put lace over the feather, isn’t that rather butter upon bacon?”
    12. Cat-lap
      A London society term for tea and coffee “used scornfully by drinkers of beer and strong waters … in club-life is one of the more ignominious names given to champagne by men who prefer stronger liquors.”
    13. Church-bell
      A talkative woman.
    14. Chuckaboo
      A nickname given to a close friend.
    15. Collie shangles
      Quarrels. A term from Queen Victoria’s journal, More Leaves , published in 1884: “At five minutes to eleven rode off with Beatrice, good Sharp going with us, and having occasional collie shangles (a Scotch word for quarrels or rows, but taken from fights between dogs) with collies when we came near cottages.”
    16. Cop a Mouse
      To get a black eye. “Cop in this sense is to catch or suffer,” Forrester writers, “while the colour of the obligation at its worst suggests the colour and size of the innocent animal named.”
    17. Daddles
      A delightful way to refer to your rather boring hands.
    18. Damfino
      This creative cuss is a contraction of “damned if I know.”
    19. Dizzy Age
      A phrase meaning “elderly,” because it “makes the spectator giddy to think of the victim’s years.” The term is usually refers to “a maiden or other woman canvassed by other maiden ladies or others.”
    20. Doing the Bear
      “Courting that involves hugging.”
    21. Don’t sell me a dog
      Popular until 1870, this phrase meant “Don’t lie to me!” Apparently, people who sold dogs back in the day were prone to trying to pass off mutts as purebreds.
    22. Door-knocker
      A type of beard “formed by the cheeks and chin being shaved leaving a chain of hair under the chin, and upon each side of mouth forming with moustache something like a door-knocker.”
    23. Enthuzimuzzy
      “Satirical reference to enthusiasm.” Created by Braham the terror, whoever that is.
    24. Fifteen puzzle
      Not the game you might be familiar with, but a term meaning complete and absolute confusion.
    25. Fly rink
      An 1875 term for a polished bald head.
    26. Gal-sneaker
      An 1870 term for “a man devoted to seduction.”
    27. Gas-Pipes
      A term for especially tight pants.
    28. Gigglemug
      “An habitually smiling face.”
    29. Got the morbs
      Use of this 1880 phrase indicated temporary melancholy.
    30. Half-rats
      Partially intoxicated.
    31. Jammiest bits of jam
      “Absolutely perfect young females,” circa 1883.
    32. Kruger-spoof
      Lying, from 1896.
    33. Mad as Hops
      Excitable.
    34. Mafficking
      An excellent word that means getting rowdy in the streets.
    35. Make a stuffed bird laugh
      “Absolutely preposterous.”
    36. Meater
      A street term meaning coward.
    37. Mind the Grease
      When walking or otherwise getting around, you could ask people to let you pass, please. Or you could ask them to mind the grease, which meant the same thing to Victorians.
    38. Mutton Shunter
      This 1883 term for a policeman is so much better than “pig.”
    39. Nanty Narking
      A tavern term, popular from 1800 to 1840, that meant great fun.
    40. Nose bagger
      Someone who takes a day trip to the beach. He brings his own provisions and doesn’t contribute at all to the resort he’s visiting.
    41. Not up to Dick
      Not well.
    42. Orf chump
      No appetite.
    43. Parish Pick-Axe
      A prominent nose.
    44. Podsnappery
      This term, Forrester writers, describes a person with a “wilful determination to ignore the objectionable or inconvenient, at the same time assuming airs of superior virtue and noble resignation.”
    45. Poked Up
      Embarrassed.
    46. Powdering Hair
      An 18th century tavern term that means “getting drunk.”
    47. Rain Napper
      An umbrella.
    48. Sauce-box
      The mouth.
    49. Shake a flannin
      Why say you’re going to fight when you could say you’re going to shake a flannin instead?
    50. Shoot into the brown
      To fail. According to Forrester, “The phrase takes its rise from rifle practice, where the queer shot misses the black and white target altogether, and shoots into the brown i.e., the earth butt.”
    51. Skilamalink
      Secret, shady, doubtful.
    52. Smothering a Parrot
      Drinking a glass of absinthe neat; named for the green color of the booze.
    53. Suggestionize
      A legal term from 1889 meaning “to prompt.”
    54. Take the Egg
      To win.
    55. Umble-cum-stumble
      According to Forrester, this low class phrase means “thoroughly understood.”
    56. Whooperups
      A term meaning “inferior, noisy singers” that could be used liberally today during karaoke sessions.

     

  15. nevver:

    1. KOREAN—CHIK CHIK POK POK (칙칙폭폭)
      The sound of a train.
    2. GERMAN—MAMPF MAMPF
      Munching.
    3. RUSSIAN—GAV GAV (ГАВ-ГАВ)
      A dog barking.
    4. JAPANESE—PACHI PACHI (パチパチ)
      The sound of a crackling fire.
    5. FRENCH—RON PSHI
      Snoring
    6. THAI—SUAAN SAEH HAEH HAA (สรวลเสเฮฮา)
      Merry-making.
    7. LATIN—TUX TAX
      Hitting, smacking
    8. GEORGIAN—GHRUTU GHRUTU (ღრუტუ ღრუტუ)
      Pig grunting.
    9. LATVIAN—BLIUKŠ
      Bubble popping.
    10. VIETNAMESE—HỚT HƠ HỚT HẢI
      Gasping for breath.
    11. KINYARWANDA—SHÍSHÍSHÍSHÍ
      Shivering with cold.
    12. FINNISH – KÄKÄTTÄÄ
      Evil laugh.